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Meet the Artists behind Capitol, Inc. 

Emma Robbins

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Diné artist and activist, Emma Robbins, uses her artwork to raise awareness about indigenous issues. She is a community organizer with a passion for empowering Indigenous women. A powerful element of her artwork details how treaties signed between the US government and indigenous communities have been broken countless times with no respect for the rights of indigenous communities.

 

Through her artwork, she strives to raise awareness about the lack of clean water on Native Nations and educate viewers about issues such as the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women crisis, representations and misrepresentations of Native Peoples, and broken treaties.

Learn more: https://www.emmarobbins.com/bio

Alfredo Salazar-Caro

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Alfredo Salazar-Caro is a creator living/working between Mexico City, NYC, and Online. His installation is a visual poem meant to honor and uplift the agricultural workers across the US coming from the Latin diaspora. It explores how the prioritization of corporate profit in the agricultural industry stands in the way of progress when it comes to workers' rights, food safety & the environment

 

His works are an amalgamation of portraiture, installation/sculpture, documentary, video, and VR/AR. Salazar-Caro is co-creator and creative director of DiMoDA, The Digital Museum of Digital Art. DiMoDA is a groundbreaking project that functions as a VR institution and exhibition platform dedicated to the development of XR Art. 

Learn more: https://salazarcaro.com/

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Keith Calhoun & Chandra McCormick

Keith Calhoun and Chandra McCormick were born and raised in the lower ninth ward of New Orleans, Louisiana. Their installation serves as a historical record of the cruel conditions of the prison labor system. 

 

As husband and wife team, they have been documenting Louisiana and its people for more than 25 years. They photograph the traditions of black church services and religious rituals; community rites and celebrations, and the cruel conditions of the Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola, a former slave-breeding plantation named for the African nation from which “the most profitable” slaves, according to slave owners, were kidnapped. 

Learn more: https://calhounmccormick.com/

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Stacy Lynn Waddell

Stacy Lynn Waddell creates works that structure sites of intersection between both real and imagined aspects of history and culture. Waddell's installation tackles climate change as she throws an emergency blanket over the National Mall Reflecting pool.

 

With a variety of transformative processes that include heat/laser technology, accumulation, embossing /debossing, interference, and gilding, these points of intersection pose important questions related to authorship, beauty, and the persuasive power of nationalistic ideology. The artist splits her time between North Carolina and New York. 

Learn more: http://www.stacylynnwaddell.com/